Mango Lassi and Eid Eats 2017!

Year in and year out, I find myself saying the same thing over and over again- I cannot believe Ramadan is almost here! We are less than two weeks away from the Islamic month of fasting, and it’s an exciting time of year for those taking part. Like years past (see 2015 and 2016), I, along with Asiya of Chocolate and Chillies, will be hosting Eid Eats 2017!

So this here is my official invitation- I cordially invite you to participate in Eid Eats 2017! Consider Eid Eats a virtual Eid potluck. We all “bring” one dish to share the day of our virtual party. The recipe you choose to share can be anything- go with tradition or take a modern spin on things, Eastern or Western cuisine, anything really!

Here is a list of the official rules:

  • Prepare and blog about the dish you’ll be sharing on June 20, 2017. You can prepare your blog post from beforehand; just make sure that it goes live by the aforementioned date. The link party will be up and running, accepting admissions until June 24, 2017.
  • Use the hashtag #EidEats2017 on your post and social media.
  • New recipes and posts will only be accepted. Unfortunately links to past blog posts will not be accepted.
  • Link your post to the party hosts blog (Chocolate and Chillies and My Ninja Naan), and make sure to include the party button/graphic (the graphic displayed above) in your post.
  • Visit the host blogs on June 24, and be sure to submit your post via the link party (the link will be set up that day).
  • Check out what our fellow bloggers (aka party goers 😉 ) have submitted, and be sure to make your way over their space and leave them some love on the comments section of their post.

 

In the spirit of festivities, I am going to share a recipe of Asiya’smango lassi! Everyone, and I mean EVERYONE, loves mango lassi! It’s become a staple in the West when it comes to South Asian cuisine. Also, today happens to be my son’s 6th birthday, and he is a lover of mango beverages! Whenever we go to a desi restaurant, he always orders a mango lassi or shake. He loves them!

(Also, if you head over to Asiya’s space, you’ll read that when she was younger, her mother would wrap ice in a towel and bang on it until the ice was crushed. The ice in my photo is a dedication to her, as I also crushed mine the same way 😉 )

 

Mango Lassi

Yield: 2 Large or 4 Small

Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup yogurt
  • ¾ cup canned mango pulp
  • ½ cup milk
  • ¼ – ½ cup sugar, to taste

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in the jar of a blender (start with ¼ cup sugar) and blitz until smooth. Taste, adding more sugar if needed.

Burns Road Lentil Dumplings In Yogurt Sauce / Burns Road Ke Dahi Baray

Karachi is arguably (not debatable in my opinion 😉 ) the foodie destination of Pakistan. The city is a melting pot of ethnicities, and that aspect of it is best represented in the food Karachi has to offer. Admittedly, I didn’t get to enjoy as much of the street food I had hoped to, but whatever I did manage to get was amazing!

I had mentioned previously that I’ve come back so inspired from the amazing eats of Karachi, and this recipe here is a direct result of that! Burns Road is an area in Karachi that is famous for a few reasons- all food related, by the way. The dahi baray (lentil based dumplings that are soaked in a spiced yogurt mixture, and served cold) of Burns Road are famous throughout Karachi! While most recipes call for urud lentils, these are actually made from finely ground moong dal (split yellow mung beans) flour. What also sets these dahi baray apart from others is how small the fritters are. I would describe them as being no bigger than one or two bites (traditionally, the baray are medium-sized patties/fritters).

I hounded the internet and fell upon this recipe, adapted it and tested it a few times, and now I can confidently say that you don’t have to travel to Pakistan to enjoy Burns Road Dahi Baray 🙂

 

 

Burns Road Ke Dahi Baray

Yield: 4 Servings

Ingredients:

Note: measurements are in actual measuring spoons/cups and not eating utensils.

For Yogurt Mixture/ Dahi:

  • 3 cups yogurt
  • 2 ½ tablespoons sugar
  • A few tablespoons milk or water, as needed
  • 2 cups chickpeas

For Lentil Fritters/ Baray:

  • ¾ cup + 2 tablespoons split yellow mung bean flour/ moong dal flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ – ½ cup water, as needed
  • Oil, for frying

For Garnish:

  • ¾ teaspoon cumin seeds
  • ¾ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • ¾ teaspoon chaat masala

Directions:

Make Yogurt Mixture/ Dahi:

In a large bowl, whisk together yogurt and sugar until completely smooth. Add milk or water, as needed, and whisk until a smooth and thick consistency is reached. Add chickpeas and set aside.

Make Fritters/ Baray:

In a large bowl, mix together flour, baking soda, and salt. Add water, a little bit at a time. Mix until smooth. The consistency of the batter should be so that when poured from a spoon, it falls off in dollops (not a steady stream).

Set aside a large bowl of cold water.

Heat oil in a large vessel over medium-high heat. To check the temperature of the oil, drop a small amount of batter into the oil. If the oil starts bubbling and the batter starts making its way upward, the temperature is perfect. Stir the batter, and use a teaspoon to drop spoonful’s of batter into the oil. Cook until the fritters are golden all around. Transfer to the water and allow them to soak for a few minutes. Squeeze the water out of the fritters using the palms of both hands, and arrange them in a serving dish.

Pour the prepared yogurt mixture over the fritters.

Make Garnish:

Heat a skillet over medium heat. Add the cumin seeds and lightly roast. Transfer seeds to a bowl and coarsely crush. Set aside.

Add red pepper flakes and chaat masala to the skillet and cook until lightly toasted, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to bowl with crushed cumin seeds and mix well. Sprinkle the spice mixture on top of the dahi baray (yogurt and fritters).

Serve cold.

Minced Meat and Lentil Biryani / Keema Masoor Biryani (Memon Masoor Pulao)

2 posts in one week? Whaaaat?

Well, this is my first shot at the Muslim Food Bloggers Challenges. Every month there is a new theme, and the month of February’s was Biryani. Biryani is basically just a spiced rice dish (often times paired with meat). In the South Asian culinary scene, the difference between Biryani and Pulao is that biryani is cooked in layers (the rice is par-boiled and then layered with the meat/masala), whereas in pulao the rice is cooked with the spices in a broth.

I chose to share the recipe for a very traditional Memon (the sub-ethnic group that I hail from) recipe, Masoor Pulao. It’s a bit of a misnomer because although it is called a pulao, it’s actually cooked in layers like biryani.

I’m excited to share this recipe for several reasons, but mostly because (a) I’ve always had trouble taking pictures of traditional Pakistani food, and I’m ready to take the plunge, and (b) it’s a recipe that has been passed down in our family, and I’m happy to finally be sharing it with actual measurements (y’all know how much trouble it is to find a desi recipe using actual measurements and not “a little this, a little that”!)

Enjoy!

keemamasoorbiryanipic

Keema Masoor Biryani

(Memon Masoor Pulao)

Yield: 4 – 6 Servings

Ingredients:

Note: Measurements are in actual measuring spoons/cups and not eating utensils.

  • 3 cups basmati rice
  • 2/3 cup brown lentils
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • ¼ cup neutral flavored oil
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1-2 green chilies, to taste, sliced lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons coriander powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala
  • 1 ½ teaspoons red chili powder
  • ¾ teaspoon turmeric
  • Salt, to taste
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • ¼ cup yogurt
  • ½ teaspoon whole black peppers
  • 4 dried bay leaves
  • Handful chopped cilantro
  • Handful chopped mint
  • Handful fried onions
  • 3 boiled eggs, peeled and sliced in half

Directions:

Rinse rice in cold water a few times, cover with water, and set aside.

Heat a small saucepan filled with water over medium-high heat. Add lentils and bring to a boil. Cook for 15-20 minutes, until mostly cooked through (should not be mushy; there should still be a bit of bite to the lentils, as they will continue cooking with the rice later). Drain and set aside.

Heat oil in a large vessel over medium-high heat. Add onions and sauté until golden brown, 5 to 10 minutes. Add meat and ginger-garlic paste and cook for a few minutes. Add chilies, coriander powder, black pepper, garam masala, red chili powder, turmeric, salt, and lemon juice. Cook, stirring often, until most of the liquid has evaporated. Add yogurt, mix well, and cook until mostly dry. Add lentils, mix, cover, and remove from heat. Set aside.

Heat water (enough to boil rice in) in a large vessel over medium-high heat. Add black peppers, bay leaves, and salt. Once it comes to a boil, add soaked rice (drain before adding), and cook until about 75% cooked through. Drain and set aside.

In a large vessel, drizzle in a bit of oil. Top with half of the rice, followed by the meat and lentil mixture. Top with cilantro, mint, and fried onions. Cover with remaining rice. Sprinkle on additional fried onions, and gently place the boiled eggs on top. Cover. Cook over low heat until the rice has finished cooking, about 30 minutes.

 

 

Check out everyone’s interpretations and adaptations of this month’s challenge below!

Ground Beef Puffs / Keema Puffs (Patties)

I’ve shared a lot of nontraditional (nontraditional for us Pakistanis) Ramadan foods, and I think it’s time to share some traditional Pakistani Ramzan fare 😉

We love the deep-fried goodness that are pakoray (fritters) and samosay (triangular meat or vegetable filled pastry), but we try to limit our intake of them to 1 to 2 times a week (2 is really pushing it) during Ramadan.  I love the ease of homemade Puffs/ Patties (pronounced pey-teez), and they make for a really impressive addition to your spread.  The key to amazing Patties is to use a good quality puff pastry, and you need a knockout filling recipe.  I finally scored a filling recipe that I can use as my go-to from Fatima Cooks.  The resulting Patties are delicious and gorgeous, and totally stand up to the beauties from Pakistani bakeries 🙂

 

KeemaPuffsPic

 

Keema Puffs/ Patties

Yield: Varies

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • ½ onion, diced small
  • 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 teaspoons coriander powder
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • ½ teaspoon red chili powder
  • Salt, to taste
  • Handful chopped cilantro
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 pounds puff pastry, thawed and cut into desired size (may need more/less)

Directions:

Heat oil in a vessel over medium-high heat. Add onions and ginger-garlic paste, and sauté until translucent, 3 to 5 minutes. Add coriander powder, cumin powder, black pepper, red pepper flakes, red chili powder, and salt. Cook for 1 minute. Add ground beef, cover, and reduce heat to medium. Stir often while breaking up large lumps. Cook until all liquid has evaporated and mixture is dry. Cool completely, then add cilantro. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 400°F and set aside a parchment lined baking sheet.

Prepare an egg-wash by whisking egg and water together in a small bowl. Set aside.

Lay puff pastry out on a lightly floured surface. Place 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground beef mixture in the center of the pastry. Fold pastry as desired and seal edges by pressing down gently with a fork. Place on prepared baking sheet and continue with remaining ground beef and pastry, placing at least 2-inches apart. Brush with egg wash, and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, until golden brown on top and on the bottom. Cool for a few minutes before serving.

Note: Puffs can be kept frozen and baked at a later time. Freeze unbaked puffs (with egg-wash) in a single layer on a parchment or plastic wrap lined baking sheet. When completely frozen, remove from pan and store in a freezer-safe container. Bake unthawed, adding a few minutes extra to baking time.

Eid Eats 2015: Falooda

Eid Eats 2015, hosted by Sarah of Flour and Spice, Asiya of Chocolate and Chillies, and myself, has finally arrived! Welcome!

I’ve been really excited to see what everyone is “bringing” to our fancy-pants party 🙂
To submit your post, simply click on the Eid Eats graphic below and follow the given instructions (submissions will be open form 7/15 through 7/18). Be sure to follow the guidelines (found here), and enjoy the party!

Also, whether you choose to bring something or not, hang around and check out the fun things everyone else is sharing. You’re sure to find some lovely Eid inspiration 🙂



Today I’m sharing with you all a delicious glass of cooling Falooda. Falooda is a traditional Pakistani/Indian dessert-beverage. Everyone seems to have their own spin on it, but generally speaking it is a concoction of milk, rose syrup, basil seeds, jello, vermicelli, and either kulfi or ice cream. The recipe I’m sharing today, really isn’t a recipe at all. All of the ingredients are layered in a tall glass, in as much or as little quantity desired. It’s a great treat to make and share on Eid because it screams fancy, and it is a quick dessert that can be pulled together in no time 🙂

While we’re at it, you can check out what Asiya is sharing here, and what Sarah is sharing here.  Also, if you would like to see the yummies our friends shared last year, you can check out Eid Eats 2014 here.

And my dear friends, Eid Mubarak! May this holiday season bring you and your families peace and happiness!

FaloodaPic

 

Falooda

Yield: Varies

Ingredients:

  • Falooda sev/noodles
  • Basil seeds
  • Jelly crystals
  • Rooh Afza (Pakistani rose syrup)
  • Kulfi or ice cream
  • Milk, optional
  • Crushed almonds or pistachios

Directions:

Prepare Falooda sev according to package instructions. Once cooked, store immersed in cold water.

Soak basil seeds in plenty of water. Seeds will swell up and double in size after some time (overnight soak is best).

Prepare jelly crystals according to package instructions. Allow it to set. Once it is completely cooled, cut into small pieces.

In tall glasses, pour a small amount of Rooh Afza as the first layer. Add desired amount of Falooda sev (with some of its water). Add a spoonful of basil seeds, followed by jelly crystals. Top with a scoop of kulfi or ice cream, and garnish with nuts. If the Falooda seems too thick, add a splash of milk.

Serve immediately.